Tag Archives: Permaculture

Koh Phangan to Bali

When Nina and I looked up information on how to get from Thailand to Malaysia and then onto the Indonesian islands, resources were limited. The most common answer to our question was “get a cheap flight”.  So I write this blog not just about our adventures, but the logistics too, hopefully serving as a resource for others.  We found this stretch of landscape fascinating, with great places to stop along the way, so if you have time – forget the plane!

3790km and now Australia in our sight...

Koh Phangan to Bali – 3790km. Now Australia in sight…

Koh Phangan

Our budget check in Phuket revealed that if Nina and I were to stay in Thailand any longer it had to be money free. We also felt undernourished in the permaculture hands-on department. That evening we spent hours scouring the internet for potential projects to join. We also wanted to continue south, this eliminated the many opportunities in northern Thailand. After limited responses from the WWOOF or Permaculture Global networks we looked up HelpX – £18 for a two year joint membership. It opened up more options to work on the land plus other opportunities ranging from eco-tourism to home help and teaching.

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HelpX is where we found Guillaume. A young French not-quite-retired lawyer establishing an “eco-lodge” in a beautiful setting, next to the beach on the party island of Koh Phangan. We decided weeks earlier that we’d avoid this island, famous once for underground hippie trance parties, now more known for 20 thousand teens dancing to Lady GaGa with dayglow “full moon” t-shirts! However, Guillaume described his property as remote (367 stairs down from the road) with a project to establish permaculture ideas and appropriate energy technology. The other main drawcard for us was the chance to learn about and help with the efforts on biological pest management systems. 

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Collecting beetles in the field

In much of South East Asia the coconut palms are being attacked by the Brontispa beetle. They lay their larvae in the young shoots of coconut palms. Trees become weak and die very quickly. The beetle was introduced accidentally on imported ornamental palms from Indonesia where it has a natural predator. In affected areas breeding and release of the predating parasitoid seems to be working well with no adverse and actually very positive effects. We were concerned about the introduction of an alien species and suspected there might be some affect on the native flora and fauna but were assured that the results are positive and this technique means there is no use of chemical pesticides. We spent time understanding the breeding procedure, visiting another operation in a nearby village and assembling the materials needed to breed. Unfortunately due to the time taken for larvae to hatch there was no chance to complete a full cycle of the program before our 3 weeks on the island were up. We did however gain valuable experience in the procedure.

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The parasitoid breeding program

Our attention to the beetle project also took a back seat as Guillaume’s water needs understandably became as important to him as anything else. The last of the rainy season downpours finished early this year and his spring began to reflect that. We gave advice on effective techniques to hold water in the landscape – use all catchment, store water high in the property, spread it over the longest distance, affecting the most life as passively as possible. We spoke about earth moving techniques to capture and hold large bodies of water and potentially rehumidify his property. Guillaume also has large roofs with no tanks and a lot of leaky pipes.

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Guillaume explaining his water resources

Unfortunately, some peoples’ idea of eco-tourism promotes aesthetics as more important than careful design, sustainability or the order of permanence. Guillaume was not particularly open to our design ideas which represent designing for water security as top of the list. He had his own ideas, and although we can offer advice, others must walk the path for themselves before the realisation of what can be achieved using PC design. Another great lesson – I have to be the change, not preach the change. My attention turns once again to Australia. Nina and I talk more that evening about our aspirations there.

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On the road again

Whilst I understand that there are many incredible projects using real permaculture design across the globe, I am coming to realise that they are few and far between. The knowledge still has a long way to travel. I wish in the last months we had dug out more of them but our journey has become rather one directional of late, more of a mission to get home above time to explore.

I have seen many examples of projects using the word “permaculture” like we see the word “eco” banded around for credibility. “We have a permaculture garden” used in place of “we grow food” or “we grow organic veg”. I’m happy that the term is becoming heard, as it leads people to ask more questions. It’s only by asking more questions that we find more answers. It’s then that we realise that permaculture is a design system, a set of ethics and principles that integrate not just our vegetable garden but the choices we make in life too. In future I will do more research on the projects I choose to volunteer.

Aside from my disillusionment of peoples’ understanding of permaculture, we had a fantastic time with Guillaume, full of great conversation, enjoyable evening meals on the shoreside deck. Garden and Rice paddy creation. Exploration of the island’s jungle and a chance to meet other expats trying new ventures in a land far from home. Oh yes, and the little boat trip at sea!

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Out in the little boat

We spent many days deliberating in Koh Phangan about our on ward route to Australia. I wrote to at least 30 shipping companies asking for passage with them from Singapore. We contacted yachts in Malaysia through HelpX. We contacted people through Couchsurfing who work for shipping agents in Singapore. We even asked about cancellations for cruise ships (just through curiosity). We applied for positions on ships and cargo vessels, wrote to Marinas and generally exhausted all options before deciding that our best chance of reaching Australia by boat was to get to the furthest place that we can, using public transport, and try from there. Many other people’s last port of call too – Bali. From Bali there will surely be people crossing that little stretch of water to Darwin!

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Koh Phangan to Georgetown

Getting off Koh Phangan island and onto a train to Malaysia was easy and should be from anywhere in Thailand. It’s cheaper to purchase your ticket in advance at a government ticket booking office yourself. We left from Surat Thani which is a popular travel junction heading south. There is no railway booking office on Koh Phangan and so an agent was necessary, and maybe easier, as the ticket includes transport to the ferry, the ferry ticket itself, and a local bus connection to the train station, plus your train ticket. Total cost of ticket – 1450TB (£33) to Butterworth, the jumping off point to Penang’s Georgetown, in Malaysia. This is the furtherest point south that a ticket can be booked from Thailand. 

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Penang ferry

We were on the 1.26am train and bedded down upon boarding. We reached the Malaysian border control by 6am. They stamped us in with a free 3 month tourist visa and after a little delay changing the chugger, we reached Butterworth by midday. The station was a short walk to the ferry terminal that takes you on a 30 minute crossing to Penang island (about 10p). We stayed in Georgtown for a couple of nights, mostly to try it’s famous food. Indian cuisine meets Chinese in a magic blend of spiced curries, sweets, funky deserts and rotis! We explored the manageable, likeable city on foot, picking up a bargain pair of new shorts at a carboot sale, and taking a few photos around the old colonial part of town.

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Georgetown to Kuala Lumpur

Travel down to Kuala Lumpur was also super easy, taking the ferry back over the water (this time free) straight to the bus terminal. Ignore anyone who approaches you for a ticket and find the bus you need. Once you have, ask someone on the bus the cost before giving your money to a conductor onboard on the driver. This saves you paying extra for the ticket which should be 32MYR (£6.50) The buses run every 20 minutes or so and take 4 or 5 hours with wide seats and a good recline. I think both Nina and I got a bit of shut-eye.

Fat recliner!

Fat recliner!

Nina had lined us up a coachsurf in KL with a very interesting and generous family. We were welcomed with open arms by Reeza, Shukreen and Kanoa. We chatted for a while up on the 19th floor of their tower block before they whisked us out and treated us to some traditional Malay food. We truly wished we had more time in KL to spend with those guys as we shared so much in common and were so fascinated by their interests in media, conservation and faith.

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Our KL family

The next day a big day out on foot was all we needed to explore the major sites of the city. Cities seem to wear us down quite quickly at this stage on our trip, but the food was out of this world and the botanical gardens seemed a world away but only a small walk from the centre of town.

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KUala Lumpur to JAkarta

We boarded the night train from KL at 23.00 to travel to Johor Bahru, having purchased our tickets the previous day at the central station – 39MYR (£8.40). Johor is on the southern Malay peninsular and if you depart for Indo from here it saves entering Singapore. We also found out that the the ferry over to Batam island was cheapest from here.

On arriving at Johor in the morning you can take the number 123 bus from right outside. Tell the driver you need the ZON ferry terminal and jump off there. No need to buy any ferry tickets in advance for this leg of the journey as some websites suggest. Ask anyone where the ticket office is and buy your 69MYR (£15) ticket for the next departing ferry to Batam Center. Bare in mind that although this 90 minute journey seems like another island off the coast of Malaysia you are actually entering Indonesia. We did consider buying a return ferry ticket as some countries ask for proof that you are leaving before issuing you a tourist visa. In this instance we risked it to save money. Nobody cared less and as long as you have your $25 to hand they wave you in with a friendly smile and a 30 day stamp.

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Batan Center to Sekupang bus…

Now in Indonesia and presuming you’re heading straight over to Java you will need to get to the infamous Pelni ferry ticket office. Ignore the taxi drivers and walk straight out of the ferry terminal. Ask for the local bus to Sekupang, price 3,000IDR (20p). This takes you over to the other side of the island. Jump out and ask anyone where the Pelni ticket office is. It’s not at the huge metal shed from where the ship departs. Instead it’s hidden up a hill at the end of the road. We opted for the “Economik” tickets which were 269,000IDR (£18) and purchasing them was simple. No need to worry about this in advance as the ship holds 3,000 people (and probably 3million cockroaches) as there is always room for one more!

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The holding pen

We waited in the “holding pen” for a few hours as it was not clear when the ship would leave. It was clear, however, that although there are some “first class” cabins available, this was a journey for the working class of Indonesia. Mostly families, some looked like they were moving house even. When the flood gates finally opened there was a stampede towards the boat as guys ran past with 40inch TV’s stapped to their heads and Mum’s dragging kids, packed lunches tucked under their arm. We arrived on 4th deck with the other sardines and packed ourselves in for the ride. 36 hours, sleepless, dirty, alive with infestations, screaming TV’s, continual chain smoking, 24/7 fleuro lights and mostly unbearable humidity. This trip is not for the faint hearted. We made some nice friends though and enjoyed some time in the crew area sharing family photo’s. We later heard that for double the cost you can take a private cabin.

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JAKARTA to BALI

We arrived early into Tanjung Priok harbour in Jakarta, 5.00am, following the crowds, asking occasionally, the way to the bus terminal. From here buses go to either “Kota”, the central station, or “Senan”, another popular departure point. We headed for Senan on the “local bus” for 20,000IDR (£1.30). I think we paid double as our bags took up a seat! We heard that you can take most onward trains to Yogya from Senan…

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Senan station

No seats were available when we arrived at Senan station and given how wrung out we were it was probably a good thing. We sat with a very patient young fella,  with great English, to figure out our next move. Everything pointed towards a guest house for the night, a little exploration of Jakarta and a train leaving tomorrow at a reasonable time. That’s exactly what we did and booked our tickets with the helpful chap for the 13.00 to Yogyakarta the next day – 90,000IDR (£6). We’d been told “Yogya” was a great place to break the journey east with the impressive Borobudur temple complex and surrounding volcanoes.

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Volcanoes from the train window

The train ride through the Java countryside was spectacular. Rice fields tumbled down the hillsides, backdropped by Volcano peaks and jungle. I thought we would see more palm plantations as described in the shocking documentary GREEN but I was pleased to see people out on the land using no mechanised techniques.

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Hand cultivated rice fields

The onward train journey from Yogya also meandered east through mostly rural landscape, arriving late in the evening in Banyuwangi, once again booked independently at the train station – 34,000IDR (£2.50) – making a 13 hour train journey very reasonably priced. It was late when we arrived in Banyuwangi and we took a room before a simple ferry crossing the next day onto Bali island to complete the 3790km journey. Ferry ticket 6,000IDR (40p).

Cost, Time and Vehicle Summary

Koh Phangan to Butterworth – £33
Butterworth to Penang (and back) 10p
Butterwoth to Kuala Lumpur – £6.50
Kuala Lumpur to Johor Bahru – £8.40
Johor Bahru to Batam – £15
Batam to Jakarta (including local buses) – £18.20
Jakarta to Yogyakarta – £6
Yogyakarta to Banyuwangi – £2.50
Banyuwangi – Bali 40p

Total travel costs (not including accommodation or visas) – £90.10 (Could you fly for that?)

Our travel time (including stopovers) – 13 days

5 local ferries
1 passenger ferry
1 long distance bus
4 local buses
4 trains

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BALI

We are now in Bali making regular visits to the Marina looking for onward travel to Australia, hopefully completing the last stage of our journey without flight. It’s a long shot. So far we have had encouraging days at the Marina followed by times of dashed hopes, watching fellow Australians leave port for Darwin. Maybe someone will take us before our visa runs out on the 16th May. Hopefully our poster will work, wish us luck…

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Do you need crew to Oz?

You can read more about this stage of our trip, our time at Bali Marina and more on Nina’s great blog – http://typotraveller.wordpress.com/

Buses, Beaches and Bangkok

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“Stop the van”!

Yep that was me screaming! I had asked the minivan driver twice to slow down. I had asked the other passengers if they were fearful for their lives. One German guy said “it’s exciting”! The driver ignored any requests. When I noticed 160 on the speedo whilst hurtling around a recommended 60 bend it was enough for me. I was getting out. “Sorry folks, I’m done with this guy”.

Luckily the place we exited the minivan was not so far from the ferry port to Koh Chang, one of Thailand’s most easterly islands.  We explained to the bemused local who saw us jump out, that the driver was crazy. Too much M150, the super strength taurine energy drink that the Thais seem to live for. The local man said that we could take the ferry in the morning and gave us all a ride 4km to a cheap room.

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The next morning we arrived on Koh Chang. We’d promised ourselves, since Paul joined us in China, that we’d head to a beach soon, certainly before he left us to England: it took over two months (once we’d explored a bit of Laos and Cambodia on the way down). It felt even more like we deserved the break off the back of the previous day’s bus and minivan trip from the Cambodian border town of Poipet.

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Island life was great. It felt a little non productive and indulgent on one hand but totally deserved on the other. The last beach we set foot on was the long shingle shore of Batumi, Georgia, last September. I hadn’t swam in the sea since Greece and never had I swam in the Gulf of Thailand. We met with Joe. It was great to see another familiar Norfolk face so far from the sticks. The home-sickness was diluted somewhat and we had some fun times including a twin kayak expedition out to an uninhabited island for a spot of swimming.  Paul and I played a DJ gig one night in Ting-Tong, a cool little reggae venue, with wages that managed to cover our accommodation for the week. Nina danced the night away. The most I’ve seen her bop since I played in Bulgaria. Good times.

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Next stop Bangkok. Only 6 hours by bus from Koh Chang, but with the boat and transfer time it was a full day in transit. We opted for the big bus after I vowed never to take another minivan. Like the other sheep, we were herded on and off vehicles along the well trodden paths of the pancake trail, little stickers attached to show our booking agent and our destination. We were dropped in the famous Khao San Road area of Bangkok. Accommodation was easy to find and super cheap at £2pppn. Here we would spend more than a week of which Joe would be around for a couple of days, Paul’s last 4 days and then just Nina and I for a few more.

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Excluding the suffocating heat and humidity we loved Bangkok! With Joe we explored the huge flower market and did the Chinatown food foot tour. We checked out the giant Buddha at the famous Wat Pho with Paul. We took to the river in the morning, the parks in the evening and the streets at night, mostly looking for Bangkok’s best street food. We were not disappointed. Thailand’s best Pad Thai? Octopus with fat rice noodles. Satay skewers to die for! Real coffee, fresh juices, sweet treats, chilli, river fish, fruit, greens… the list goes on. Keep checking Nina’s blog as I’m sure she’ll be writing about the food of Bangkok…

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It was sad to see Paul off in Bangkok. I’m not sure when we will next meet. The homesickness kicked in once more and thoughts of him seeing my family a couple of days from departure was quite heart-wrenching. “Give them a squeeze from me mate”.

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We booked ourselves onto a bus north to check out some permaculture projects. I felt and feel pretty disconnected from the inspirational projects, people and general world of permaculture. Although this journey is a permie one, I have been sidetracked. Panya Project, Rak Tamachat and many more interesting demonstration sites are in northern Thailand. Unfortunately soon after we’d booked our bus tickets it was budget check-in time. It’s no surprise that although we have mostly remained on budget, as we head into our 15th month on the road, things are tight. We took the decision to compromise a trip north. We detoured once before, heading up to Romania, but that was for a paid teaching position that justified the extra loop. This time is different. We decided that we have a very unclear time ahead of us and so we should move more directly towards Australia.

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So we find ourselves in Phuket, another overnight bus trip south. Here there are 3 major Marinas. We have put together some posters and will advertise ourselves as volunteer crew for any boats, yachts or ships heading south towards Malaysia, Indonesia or Australia. We spent the last two days on a moped in and about the Marinas and Yacht clubs pinning up posters, chatting to potential skippers and getting the general lowdown on boat hitching a ride. From here boats stop in Langkawi, Malaysia and so we may well travel there by bus soon, connecting ports and marinas along the way. There are Wwoof hosts and Permcaulture projects on route so we’re back to a game of dot-to-dot, similar to our european leg. Wish us luck!

CREWAD

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Check out Nina’s blog here

The Patch – Remote Permaculture Maintenance

Greetings from a far

One of our big concerns once our food forest was planted, and knowing that we would be leaving the country for an unknown amount of years, was how would our little fruit trees and bushes survive the encroaching grass, blackthorn and volunteer plants.

We had no idea at the time. There was no design element that we could think of, other than expensive, non natural sheet mulching techniques. We didn’t give that a second thought. Here’s where I believe design can happen organically, not necessarily at the offset, but when an idea comes to mind due to necessity.

Winter was fast encroaching and so was my 35th birthday. I am in China. I thought everyday about how our mulberry, cherries, apples, pears and sea buckthorn berries needed tucking in for winter. A cosy, thick bed of mulch to keep them roots warm and stave of the early grass growth of 2013.

I plucked up the courage and boldly requested my family to help with the “M” of OBREDIM – Maintenance. “If we can get a farmer to drop off 20 big bales of straw I’m sure it can be done in a half day” I asked squeamishly. Mum was keen and she asked that I email through some detailed instructions…

On my birthday, December 17th, I woke in China to check my emails. Not only had Mum written a great account of their “beautiful day” at the Patch but Clare had attached a whole photo album of the proceedings. We were so happy to see that the food forest had been mulched but more importantly Mum, Dad, Clare, Ethan and Phoebe confessed that they had had a really fun and enjoyable day.

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR ENTHUSIASM TOWARDS OUR ONGOING PROJECT AT THE PATCH. PLEASE FILL YOUR BOOTS WITH FRUIT IN 2013

The Family on there way...

The Family on their way…

Clare checking out the walnut

Clare checking out the walnut

Ethan on the pile of bales

Ethan on the pile of bales

Keen niece and nephew

Keen niece and nephew

Greetings from a far

Greetings from a far

Couldn't ask for a better birthday present

Couldn’t ask for a better birthday present

Dad handing out instructions

Dad handing out instructions

Phoebe loads a bales

Phoebe loads a bale

Relaxing in the sun

Relaxing in the sun

They're on it now!

They’re on it now!

Mum shifts the bales around

Mum shifts the bales around

A beautiful day at the Patch

A beautiful day at the Patch

Tea break

Tea break

Hot elderberry cordial

Hot elderberry cordial

Birthday message

Birthday message

Bit of maintenance on the tanks

Bit of maintenance on the tanks

A well earned rest

A well earned rest

Mulch it!!!

Mulch it!!!

Nice and thick!

Nice and thick!

A winter bed...

A winter bed…

Mum mulches the native hedge

Mum mulches the native hedge

In full mucling swing...

In full mulching swing…

Clare looks satisfied

Clare looks satisfied

Spread it about!

Spread it about!

Perfect job

Perfect job

Native hedge mulched

Native hedge mulched

Ethan relaxes (in mulch)

Ethan relaxes (in mulch)

Phoebe joins him

Phoebe joins him

Beauitful

Beauitful

Nearly done..

Nearly done..

Perfect, thank you so so much

Perfect, thank you so so much

Farewell Kazakhstan…

When we finally walked from the embassy with our China visa in hand we’d been in Astana for 13 days. Some would say that’s an unlucky number and we never planned to be in the bland and sterile capital so long but we had been very fortunate. In our final opportunity to acquire a visa for China we managed it independently – travel forums had suggested it was not possible but we persevered and with the kind hospitality of our adopted Russian/Kazakh family our stay was extremely pleasant.

They took us in when our strange landlady turfed us out. We were treated to cooking lessons of all the Russian and Kazakh recipes they knew and on our last weekend we did a spot of fishing. Whilst I showed Sam the basics of lure fishing with a spinner Andrey had his own way. He donned a scuba suit and strapped on a harpoon! Half and hour later he emerged from the near frozen broad like a Mad Max swamp hunter with a bunch of pike hanging from his waist. Definitely a more efficient way of doing things. Sam and I stood gobsmacked still trying to untangle a knot from the reel whilst Andrey was supping warm tea preparing to descale the fish.

We devoured them, gently fried with onions, later that evening before the family served up the Kazakh speciality, Beshbarmak. It was our last evening with Andrey, Anna and the boys and they were not going to let us leave without eating horses arse! Yep, literally. We’d accompanied Andrey to the market a couple of days before and after tasting fermented mares milk he marched us around to his favourite meat lady. He picked a monster horse sausage and also a funny tubular piece of meat which he explained he would have to cook separately as not to taint the flavour of the other cuts. It wasn’t until the meat had been boiling for 3 hours and the whole house stunk that I asked what part of the horse it was… the answer explained the very strong smell, the nearly inedible taste but apparently desirable choice cut…Horses arse!

The next morning we dropped the kids at kindergarden and Andrey and Anna took us all to the train station for our 20 hours overnighter to Almaty – origin of the famous apple.

We had hoped that the majority of our time in Kazakhstan would be spent in the wild apple forests of the Tien Shan mountains bordering China and Kyrgyzstan collecting seed of the father of all apples to disperse to our friends in various parts of the world, doing our part to save the genetic diversity of the worlds most eaten fruit. Easy to say all that when you didn’t do it. To my disappointment by the time we arrived in Almaty, because of our China visa hold up, we had only one day before our Kazakh visa expired and so immediately boarded an overnight sleeper bus into the the north west of China…So long malus sieversii. Farewell Kazakhstan…

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Overland Travel Check-in

This week Nina and I completed our monthly travel check-in here in Astana. We departed England back in January and on the 23rd of each month we try to complete our check-in. An important part of permaculture design is to accept and respond to feedback. For a land-based design this involves observation of your garden or farm and making changes to things that can be improved to benefit the whole system. It’s no different with our travel design really, just that our tweaks may be behavioural or logistical…

We use the four questions taken from my diploma guild meetings and talk to one another for a short time whilst the listener scribes some notes to refer back to. It’s very important that the listener does not respond, we call this active listening, so that the talker gets the opportunity to voice all their thoughts. Here are the four questions;

What’s going well for you?

What are you finding challenging?

What are your next achievable steps?

What are your long term visions?

Answering these questions really helps to celebrate great times, grumble about what’s getting you down, understand some actions to get the next thing done and also dream about the future. It sounds a bit geeky but we find it’s been a very valuable part of our overland trip.

We also tagged on another element to our check-in which involves understanding whether one another’s needs are being met. We have a big list of our needs and ask each other if we feel they’re being fulfilled. If the answer is “no” then we may give a suggested tweak to make sure that need is met going forward. Some of our needs are… music, nature, solitude, spontaneity, warmth, community, intimacy and the list goes on….

So it’s 9 months since we left England. Geographically we are around half way to Australia. We have spent time in Morocco, Spain, France, Italy, Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Turkey, Georgia, Russia and now Kazakhstan. I feel it’s a good time to refer back to the goals we set out in our travel design. Are we walking the talk? Are we doing what we set out to do? This is another important part of permaculture design. Observe and interact. Accept and respond to feedback…

Our goals as set out in January…

  • to get to Australia in the most environmentally responsible way – well we could walk or cycle but we never really considered that option. So far we have taken buses, boats, trains and hitch-hiked along the way. On arrival in Australia we will calculate our carbon footprint and sequester it using new techniques we have learnt.
  • to have fun, enjoy the experience and remain healthy – there is absolutely no way that this journey cannot be an enjoyable one. There have been challenges but every day is a new and exciting experience.
  • to learn about other cultures and people’s way of life – living with families and working on farms in different countries is helping us gain a greater understanding of this.
  • to gain new practical skills and traditional understandings – building in Morocco and teaching on a PDC in Romania have been my practical highlights. Communicating with no local language is also a great new skill that I’m enjoying.
  • to use skills and resources as a gift or exchange – help in the gardens of our hosts and swapping seeds along the way is a great way to remember the people we have met so far.
  • to engineer opportunities to incorporate my diploma – this is certainly one of the more challenging goals but so far I have made designs in Spain and Italy with more work to follow in China
  • to express creativity – playing at the Beglika Festival in Bulgaria was fantastic and having the time to experiment with music and writing is a real privilege.
  • to Wwoof in each country we pass through – we didn’t manage it in the countries that we transited through but have in all the rest, learning new skills and making new friends.
  • to connect with wilderness and natural surroundings – Greece has certainly been my wilderness highlight – trekking through the Vikos Gorge was spectacular.
  • to inform and report on important and interesting topics – hopefully my blog is doing that and I also like to add useful info to the Lonely Planet travel forum to help others along the way.
  • to remain within our allocated funds – it’s a squeeze doing this journey on such a shoestring budget but we are just about on budget. Couch-surfing and hitch-hiking have been essential for that.
  • to spend some time with friends and family – one day with my parents in Venice, the PDC in Romania, travelling with Sam and meeting folk in China…
  • to support one another, honour ourselves and harmonise our needs – I feel this is the most important goal and one that so far is making the journey a full and rich experience.

I am thankful that I was introduced to these processes through my permaculture tutor, the PDC’s that I have attended and the co-creation of this life with Nina.

Ermitaj

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A few days ago we finished a two week Permaculture Design Course at the Ermitaj in North West Romania. I have experienced this course as student, host and now as part of the facilitating team. It has been a very rewarding, challenging and eye-opening experience. Nina and I joined Pascale, Sam and Judith to form a teaching team in a friendly and supportive environment, the perfect place to start my teaching in Permaculture.

The Ermitaj is run by Philippe and Adriana in a lovely valley. It’s the third PDC they have hosted and we had a full international crew and students along with a healthy Romanian contingent. A jammed packed two weeks full of Permaculture ethics, principles, methods and practical sessions including building a synergistic garden, rocket stove, 18 day compost, jams, tool care, natural plastering, contour mapping, soil tests, pizza night and plenty of design time.

The course was finished off with a talent/no talent night and we received some great feedback before certificates were handed out and fairwells to new friends. Many thanks to a great team, great students and a great host.

WasteNoMo

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Our second stop in Bulgaria, and after a couple of days in the lovely city of Plovdiv, was with Dimo and his worms.  We had arranged a couch surf with another guy in the area but when he had to go the Beglika festival as a helper we were told Dimo would take us in and probably show us a thing or two. We were grateful for the opportunity to understand a low impact livelihood and help Dimo out on the worm farm for a few days.

He kindly picked us up from Kazanlak and we went for a family visit, an off road adventure and a swim before cooking up a late dinner and sampling the stupidly cheap but very tasty Bulgarian beer.

We spent the next few days at the worm farm. Dimo collects fresh cow poo, mixes it with straw, moistens it and sets the worms to work. It takes a few months for them to eat their way through the feast but the end result is weed free, high water retentive, humus rich soil, perfect for growing annual veg and seedlings. He bags the castings and sells them to customers around Bulgaria. During the process the worms also double in mass and he receives an additional income from them.

Dimo also doubles up his worm heap as a plant nursery, stacking functions and making best use of his space. He grows tomatoes and paulownia, a fast growing lightweight timber perfect for tool handles. He uses no chemicals and keep his mole population in check using castor plant which exudes chemicals that the moles dislike.

Dimo also produces his own biofuel from waste vegetable oil in a processor that he built himself. He powers his truck and his tractor from the fuel, true to his business name WastNoMo.

We loved our time with Dimo. We saw some great places, Thracian tombs, old communist monuments and natural beauty. The day before we left he took us to visit Paul of the Balkan Ecology Project who was happy to show us around his permaculture inspired garden.  We were to see them both again at their BalkanEP venue at Beglika Festival.