Tag Archives: Organic

March Against Monsanto

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On May 25, people around the world will unite to March Against Monsanto.

Why?

  • Research studies have shown that Monsanto’s genetically-modified foods can lead to serious health conditions such as the development of cancer tumors, infertility and birth defects.
  • In the United States, the FDA, the agency tasked with ensuring food safety for the population, is steered by ex-Monsanto executives, and we feel that’s a questionable conflict of interests and explains the lack of government-lead research on the long-term effects of GMO products.
  • Recently, the U.S. Congress and president collectively passed the nicknamed “Monsanto Protection Act” that, among other things, bans courts from halting the sale of Monsanto’s genetically-modified seeds.
  • For too long, Monsanto has been the benefactor of corporate subsidies and political favoritism. Organic and small farmers suffer losses while Monsanto continues to forge its monopoly over the world’s food supply, including exclusive patenting rights over seeds and genetic makeup.
  • Monsanto’s GMO seeds are harmful to the environment; for example, scientists have indicated they have caused colony collapse among the world’s bee population.

What solutions do we advocate?

  • Voting with your dollar by buying organic and boycotting Monsanto-owned companies that use GMOs in their products.
  • Labeling of GMOs so that consumers can make those informed decisions easier.
  • Repealing relevant provisions of the US’s “Monsanto Protection Act.”
  • Calling for further scientific research on the health effects of GMOs.
  • Holding Monsanto executives and Monsanto-supporting politicians accountable through direct communication, grassroots journalism, social media, etc.
  • Continuing to inform the public about Monsanto’s secrets.
  • Taking to the streets to show the world and Monsanto that we won’t take these injustices quietly.

We will not stand for cronyism. We will not stand for poison. That’s why the world shall March Against Monsanto.

I send this information out to people with the hope that some of you folk can represent in our absence, as will be on Lombok island, Indonesia…

Find one of the 330 cities already participating: http://bit.ly/ZTDsk8

Or you can do some kind of online thing like we will…

by checking the link here http://on.fb.me/ZUxe3o

say no to monsanto!!!

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Inna Bali

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Another month ticks by. This time in Bali. Let’s hope that when we collect our passports from the immigration office tomorrow they have extended our visa and we are legally here. A month in Bali has been necessary. Looking for the allusive boat ride to Australia is a time consuming process.

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In bali there is certainly over-populated ever-consuming pre-apocalyptic tourist cauldrons like Kuta where we’ve been based for a few weeks now (see Nina’s blogs – Stars Over Kuta and The One That Got Away), but luckily when we were not fixated on marina opportunities, we got the chance to explore the insides of Bali too.

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In contrast to the devastation that the overburdened holiday hotspots bring, Bali has some great regenerative, co-operative and forward thinking permaculture demonstration projects, disaster relief programmes and, dare I say it, “eco- tourism” facilities.

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Our fist visit to the “real” Bali was to IDEP, “a local Indonesian NGO, founded in 1999, that develops and delivers training, community programs and media related education to sustainable development through Permaculture, and Community-based Disaster Management.” Their words – best to check the website for more detailed information.

The staff there were super friendly, helpful and also let us film an interview. We bought seeds from their seed-saving programme and explored the gardens. We were so relieved to see folk making real positive change, a tough job.

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After slagging off “eco tourism” in my last blog I was dubious to visit our next destination. Not a planned visit. On a trip to some hot springs at the base of a volcano we saw a wooden sign for “Organic Farm & Stay“. We were actually looking for a place to kip for the night and also intrigued as to what they may be growing in this haven of coffee, cacao and rice. We decided to pay them a visit.

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We were welcomed by Wayan and Marjan who were keen to show us around. Wayan is a natural in front of camera and he explained their concept as the film rolled. He told us how most farmers in Bali have resorted to chemical agriculture in recent years. Effective marketing from agro-chemical companies have convinced the farmers that their herbicides and pesticides are necessary along with their terminator seeds. At The Organic Farm Bali, Wayan explained that they are working with the local farmers in the village to move forward to organic only agriculture with his emphasis on “making farmers cool again”.

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The tourism side of this enterprise is the home stay. They ask that people who come have a minimum stay of two nights with the idea that they spend at least one full day learning techniques from the farmers in the two adjoining properties who are producing the food for the visitors.

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Whilst out on the road in inner Bali we managed to observe the “real” Bali up close and personal. Poodling on our bike, along the ridges of volcanoes, around lakes, through rice terraces and along country lanes in villages, we met with village folk selling their own produce, roasting their own coffee and harvesting their own cacao. The scenery was stunning and the landscape varied.

There are plenty of other interesting projects that we didn’t manage to see but if you are in Bali maybe you should check them out – R.O.L.E Foundation have an extensive teaching program, Green School has a worldwide reputation for sustainable education and Side by Side Organic Farm has also been recommended to us, helping Bali’s disadvantaged.

Nina and I now reside in a house near the beach. We’ve been taken in by a Japanese man, Bhakto. We made friends with him whilst couch-surfing up in Ubud and he couldn’t bare the thought of us staying in Kuta another day. We’re happy that we all share interests, for him and I, permaculture and underground music, for him and Nina, permaculture and wellbeing. Next stop Australia?

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WasteNoMo

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Our second stop in Bulgaria, and after a couple of days in the lovely city of Plovdiv, was with Dimo and his worms.  We had arranged a couch surf with another guy in the area but when he had to go the Beglika festival as a helper we were told Dimo would take us in and probably show us a thing or two. We were grateful for the opportunity to understand a low impact livelihood and help Dimo out on the worm farm for a few days.

He kindly picked us up from Kazanlak and we went for a family visit, an off road adventure and a swim before cooking up a late dinner and sampling the stupidly cheap but very tasty Bulgarian beer.

We spent the next few days at the worm farm. Dimo collects fresh cow poo, mixes it with straw, moistens it and sets the worms to work. It takes a few months for them to eat their way through the feast but the end result is weed free, high water retentive, humus rich soil, perfect for growing annual veg and seedlings. He bags the castings and sells them to customers around Bulgaria. During the process the worms also double in mass and he receives an additional income from them.

Dimo also doubles up his worm heap as a plant nursery, stacking functions and making best use of his space. He grows tomatoes and paulownia, a fast growing lightweight timber perfect for tool handles. He uses no chemicals and keep his mole population in check using castor plant which exudes chemicals that the moles dislike.

Dimo also produces his own biofuel from waste vegetable oil in a processor that he built himself. He powers his truck and his tractor from the fuel, true to his business name WastNoMo.

We loved our time with Dimo. We saw some great places, Thracian tombs, old communist monuments and natural beauty. The day before we left he took us to visit Paul of the Balkan Ecology Project who was happy to show us around his permaculture inspired garden.  We were to see them both again at their BalkanEP venue at Beglika Festival.