The Big Hitch (Part 1)

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“You can’t hitchhike across the outback” the scaremongers said. “Do you know how many backpackers go missing out there?” questioned the naysayers. “Why don’t you just fly”? we were asked my the conformists!

Well i’m sorry folks but we obviously didn’t take any notice of the warnings and just happened to have had one of the most memorable and enriching stints of our whole journey from Caston, Norfolk, England to Dulong, Queensland, Australia.

Joe

We rocked up at the BP petrol station in Darwin (A) about 11am last Monday. Nina had a quick pee while I guarded the bags. I noticed a chap walking towards the door and as I nipped in for the loo I said to Nina “just ask that guy if he’s heading south babe”.

As I emerged a few minutes later I saw Nina through the window gesturing me to hurry – isn’t it great when a stranger offers to give you a ride without having to stick out your thumb at the road!

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Joe lived in an Aboriginal community. We spent five hours or so with him hearing about his early life at a prisoner of war camp in Yugoslavia, his views on the current political situation in the Northern Territory and the “holes” in Australia. The holes he’s referring to are the mines. “Dotted everywhere” he said. He even pulled in to Pine Creek, famous from the gold rush to give us a glimpse of an old mining town. We stood up at the lookout and peered down into a lake 135m deep where a mountain of the same height used to sit.

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Joe dropped us in Mataranka (B), 422km south of Darwin. With only an hour or so of daylight left we decided to stay the night and walked into a camp ground. We’d sent our tent and sleeping bags home from Cambodia thinking we wouldn’t need them and so asked the staff if they had any spares but in the end laid out our ponchos for some kind of damp-proofing and squeezed ourselves into the one replacement bag we’d bought in Darwin. It was a cold cold night. We got a little sleep and were up with the sun to try for the hitch south.

Aaron

As we walked from the caravan park to the centre of the village we spotted a road train parked up for the night. Nina joked that it would be cool to ride in one as they look so invincible. This one was facing Darwin though and so we stuck out a thumb as the sun came up.

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A couple of minutes later a guy appeared from the truck eating a bowl of multicoloured cereal. I wandered over for a chat.

“Morning mate. Heading up to Darwin are ya?”

“Nah mate. Turnin’ round, heading down to Adelaide”

“Ah yeah. Don’t spose you can take a couple hitch hikers can ya?”

“Yeah no worries. I can drop you off at Alice anyways. Just gotta wait for fuel and check me tyres. Chill out for a bit.”

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Aaron’s road train was 52 meters long and had a weight limit of 122 tonnes. The road trains travel a fairly constant 100 kmph and usually don’t break for kangaroo’s. Aaron had a fridge, freezer, microwave, fishing rod and a DVD player amongst other things but there was only one spare seat which meant Nina got to ride on the bed.

Aaron was an Adelaide boy. A picture of his wife and daughter faced him from the sun visor. He sees them once a week if he is not away for longer. He was a nice guy working hard for his family.

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We travelled for 6 or 7 hours with Aaron, 542km south to the Three Ways Roadhouse (C), the turning point east for Queensland. I was amazed by the beauty of the scenery, the red soil, the termite cathedrals, the subtle changing flora. It was so alien to me and so interesting. The odd ute, truck or caravan passed us by but otherwise it was a very peaceful place.

We arrived at Three Ways Roadhouse at about 15.30, keen to keep moving. We met Charles there on his way to Brisbane but he was jammed full. We walked around the corner onto the Barkley highway and out went the thumb in hope of a few more km before the day was out.

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Norman

Meeting Norman was a funny encounter. We were standing out at the Queensland junction having been picked up there once already only to tell the Singapore family who collected us that they were going the wrong way. They turned around and dropped us back where we came from. The next vehicle that came along was Norman. He was doing a u-turn right in front of us when I somehow managed to engage in a conversation through his window.

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“Which way to Queensland guys” he asked, looking fairly bemused.

“This way, the way we’re going” I answered. “Do you have a bit of space?”

“Errrr, yeah hop it. You’ll have to move that junk and sit on the esky mate.”

Norman had been driving since 4am straight off the back of a flight from Vietnam. He’s a bus driver and was relocating from Darwin to Cairns. He told us how shattered he was and he’d be pulling in for the night at the next place. That happened to be Barkley homestead, the place we’d heard of and were hoping to get to…

20 minutes along the track he realised that he was doing a u-turn for a reason and   whilst chatting with us along with his tiredness he had forgot to get fuel. So back we went to Three Ways for our third visit and a refuel, before turning east to Barkley Homestead as dusk drifted in.

It was dark by the time we arrived at Barkley. Easy to sneak in, lay down some cardboard and pull over the sleeping bag, helped greatly by the friendly irish trio who leant us a tarp for damp-proofing.

We were up again before the sun and waiting out front for the early hitch, hoping to catch those people trying for the longest daily distance with the brightest start to the day. We chatting with another road train guy who was not keen on taking us. There was also the cycle crew doing a 15000km tour of Oz. Obviously no room there.

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Just as the sun appeared on the horizon, Norman appeared from the camp grounds. He drove straight over to where Nina and I were standing and said “just gotta get some fuel guys and I’ll pick you up.” He did his famous u-turn and returned a few minutes later looking somewhat perkier than the previous evening.

As we set off towards Queensland we felt like old friends, safe in the knowledge that we would push a long way east with Norm that day.

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After another night under the stars, this time in Hughenden (E), a flat tyre and a couple of stops in old outback towns, Norman dropped us in Townsville before he headed up to Cairns. We had spent three great days together, chatted our way across 1540km of Australia, exchanged books and emails and finally arrived on the east coast of Queensland!

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Australia!

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A few days ago and exactly 17 months after leaving Norfolk we landed on the Australian shore of Darwin in the Northern Territory. What a relief! We are so happy that we made it – our flightless journey from England to Australia.

Since leaving Kupang in Indonesia we past through our 20th country, Timor-Leste.

It was the roughest part of the trip. Swollen seas. Wind on the nose all the way. Compromised equipment and a few unforeseen events including colliding with an unknown object in the night, a 48 hour round trip back to the Timor-Leste capital. Repairs. Despair. Expense. When we finally entered the Timor Sea things were bouncy to say the least.

On entering Australian waters we had customs fly over to warn us and to greet us. Dolphins at the hull and a stunning Aussie sunset followed before glimpsing the lighthouse at Point Fourcroy.

Thank you so so so much to Keith and Lea for having us on board Tientos for the last month. Thank you also to all the amazing people that have helped us along the way, you know who you are. And by far the biggest thank you of all – thank you Nina for being the most perfect person in the world to travel and adventure with. You are amazing!

Hello Australia we are here. Please give us the best!

Lombok to Kupang

I write from Kupang where we have landed after 9 days at sea with our hosts onboard Tientos, Keith and Lea. We’ve had a mixed bag of calm and lumpy seas, wind on the nose and not too many chances to open the sails out fully.

630 nautical miles. 3 nightwatches. 3 anchorages. Volcanoes, Komodo dragons, new knots, amazing food, occasional sleep, lots of reading, kayaks to shore, boules on the beach, a birthday, deserted islands and coral reef. But no fish for dinner yet!

We will be here in Kupang for a few days whilst we complete paperwork to clear out of Indonesia. Our next stop will be Dili in East Timor before the crossing to Darwin.

Check out Nina’s blog for all the shenanigans onboard…

Sailing Home

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Out of office reply: Gone Sailing.

We apologise as we are currently unable to respond to your emails. We are onboard the Tientos with Lea and Keith bound for Darwin, Australia via Komodo and Kupang, Indonesia and and Dili, Timor-Lieste.

We are in capable and experienced hands and very much looking forward to the voyage, with our dream of flightless travel from England to Australia intact.

Wish us luck

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March Against Monsanto

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On May 25, people around the world will unite to March Against Monsanto.

Why?

  • Research studies have shown that Monsanto’s genetically-modified foods can lead to serious health conditions such as the development of cancer tumors, infertility and birth defects.
  • In the United States, the FDA, the agency tasked with ensuring food safety for the population, is steered by ex-Monsanto executives, and we feel that’s a questionable conflict of interests and explains the lack of government-lead research on the long-term effects of GMO products.
  • Recently, the U.S. Congress and president collectively passed the nicknamed “Monsanto Protection Act” that, among other things, bans courts from halting the sale of Monsanto’s genetically-modified seeds.
  • For too long, Monsanto has been the benefactor of corporate subsidies and political favoritism. Organic and small farmers suffer losses while Monsanto continues to forge its monopoly over the world’s food supply, including exclusive patenting rights over seeds and genetic makeup.
  • Monsanto’s GMO seeds are harmful to the environment; for example, scientists have indicated they have caused colony collapse among the world’s bee population.

What solutions do we advocate?

  • Voting with your dollar by buying organic and boycotting Monsanto-owned companies that use GMOs in their products.
  • Labeling of GMOs so that consumers can make those informed decisions easier.
  • Repealing relevant provisions of the US’s “Monsanto Protection Act.”
  • Calling for further scientific research on the health effects of GMOs.
  • Holding Monsanto executives and Monsanto-supporting politicians accountable through direct communication, grassroots journalism, social media, etc.
  • Continuing to inform the public about Monsanto’s secrets.
  • Taking to the streets to show the world and Monsanto that we won’t take these injustices quietly.

We will not stand for cronyism. We will not stand for poison. That’s why the world shall March Against Monsanto.

I send this information out to people with the hope that some of you folk can represent in our absence, as will be on Lombok island, Indonesia…

Find one of the 330 cities already participating: http://bit.ly/ZTDsk8

Or you can do some kind of online thing like we will…

by checking the link here http://on.fb.me/ZUxe3o

say no to monsanto!!!

Inna Bali

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Another month ticks by. This time in Bali. Let’s hope that when we collect our passports from the immigration office tomorrow they have extended our visa and we are legally here. A month in Bali has been necessary. Looking for the allusive boat ride to Australia is a time consuming process.

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In bali there is certainly over-populated ever-consuming pre-apocalyptic tourist cauldrons like Kuta where we’ve been based for a few weeks now (see Nina’s blogs – Stars Over Kuta and The One That Got Away), but luckily when we were not fixated on marina opportunities, we got the chance to explore the insides of Bali too.

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In contrast to the devastation that the overburdened holiday hotspots bring, Bali has some great regenerative, co-operative and forward thinking permaculture demonstration projects, disaster relief programmes and, dare I say it, “eco- tourism” facilities.

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Our fist visit to the “real” Bali was to IDEP, “a local Indonesian NGO, founded in 1999, that develops and delivers training, community programs and media related education to sustainable development through Permaculture, and Community-based Disaster Management.” Their words – best to check the website for more detailed information.

The staff there were super friendly, helpful and also let us film an interview. We bought seeds from their seed-saving programme and explored the gardens. We were so relieved to see folk making real positive change, a tough job.

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After slagging off “eco tourism” in my last blog I was dubious to visit our next destination. Not a planned visit. On a trip to some hot springs at the base of a volcano we saw a wooden sign for “Organic Farm & Stay“. We were actually looking for a place to kip for the night and also intrigued as to what they may be growing in this haven of coffee, cacao and rice. We decided to pay them a visit.

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We were welcomed by Wayan and Marjan who were keen to show us around. Wayan is a natural in front of camera and he explained their concept as the film rolled. He told us how most farmers in Bali have resorted to chemical agriculture in recent years. Effective marketing from agro-chemical companies have convinced the farmers that their herbicides and pesticides are necessary along with their terminator seeds. At The Organic Farm Bali, Wayan explained that they are working with the local farmers in the village to move forward to organic only agriculture with his emphasis on “making farmers cool again”.

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The tourism side of this enterprise is the home stay. They ask that people who come have a minimum stay of two nights with the idea that they spend at least one full day learning techniques from the farmers in the two adjoining properties who are producing the food for the visitors.

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Whilst out on the road in inner Bali we managed to observe the “real” Bali up close and personal. Poodling on our bike, along the ridges of volcanoes, around lakes, through rice terraces and along country lanes in villages, we met with village folk selling their own produce, roasting their own coffee and harvesting their own cacao. The scenery was stunning and the landscape varied.

There are plenty of other interesting projects that we didn’t manage to see but if you are in Bali maybe you should check them out – R.O.L.E Foundation have an extensive teaching program, Green School has a worldwide reputation for sustainable education and Side by Side Organic Farm has also been recommended to us, helping Bali’s disadvantaged.

Nina and I now reside in a house near the beach. We’ve been taken in by a Japanese man, Bhakto. We made friends with him whilst couch-surfing up in Ubud and he couldn’t bare the thought of us staying in Kuta another day. We’re happy that we all share interests, for him and I, permaculture and underground music, for him and Nina, permaculture and wellbeing. Next stop Australia?

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