Category Archives: Random

2013 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 7,300 times in 2013. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 6 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Image

The Shared – 3rd January 2014

20140103 GIG THE SHARED

The Patchworks Family

Ely & Patch45

Ely & Patch44

The last blog update from the Patch was my birthday family mulching session back in December. I thought that now  Nina and I are settling into life in Australia it was about time for a long distance update as the Patchworks family have been at it again.

Mum, Dad, Jonny, Clare, Ethan and Phoebe revisited The Patch in June to finish off the mulch on the elaeagnus and alder hedges along with some extra mulch for the walnut and Patchworks Pippin. They took plenty of photos and as you can see things are looking really good…

Ely & Patch14

Mum mulching the elaeagnus hedge

Ely & Patch24

The native hedge in blossom

Ely & Patch27

Sea Buckthorn berry looking healthy

Ely & Patch30

Ethan doing a grand job

Ely & Patch32

Super mulchers

Ely & Patch35

Nina Eve’s medlar looking amazing!

All this green fingered work seems to have really inspired Mum and Dad.  Mum has always been a keen gardener, it runs in the family, but since retirement her and Dad have given their garden an extra boost and this year their new veg patch featured in the village open gardens 2013. Mum says she has really diversified this year with mixed companion planting and plenty of pest distractors, not to mention tonnes of comfrey! I’m sure they were happy to get a bit of help from the grandchildren.

Open Gardens Weekend35

Mum looking very proud of her new raised beds. Good job Dad!

Open Gardens Weekend37

Cheeky smiles all round!

Open Gardens Weekend41

Phoebe definitely looks like she’s having fun!

Open Gardens Weekend45

Stunning veg!

A couple of weeks ago Nina and I received news of another visit to The Patch by Mum and Dad. They just can’t keep away! Maybe that’s because I keep asking for photos!

Much to our surprise and delight, the latest batch of pictures revealed the first fruits of our plantings. We have pears on the Williams along with red gooseberries and white currants. It’s only 2 years since the big tree planting and we have the first signs of productivity. Mum confessed that she hadn’t checked too many of the trees as she was worried about snakes but she did manage to pick 8oz of white currants!

Patch Visit 3 Aug19

The Williams Pear in fruit!

Patch Visit 3 Aug23

Gooseberries!

Patch Visit 3 Aug22

White currants!

The Patchworks family visits, updates and photos really makes the distance between Norfolk and Australia smaller. Nina and I are truly grateful for the time and energy that you have put into the Patch. We hope that one day the fruits are abundant and that you can reap the benefits at harvest time.

We miss you

The Big Hitch (Part 2)

IMG_6631

Steve

Steve had been expecting us in Townsville for a couple of weeks, although he was a bit unsure of the exact date we would show up. Nina contacted him through Couchsurfing whilst we were in Indonesia and we somehow managed to arrive on the proposed date.

Steve worked in the mining industry as did so many of the people we met “along the track”. He also seemed to be a professional couchsurf host having welcomed over 200 people into his apartment in the last 12 months. Nina and I had a well earned shower and joined Steve and two other couchsurfers, Anna and Pauline, for our first square meal in days.

IMG_6615

The following day Steve went off to work and Nina and I explored Townsville’s Botanical Gardens, traditional brewery and seafront walks before we cooked for the crew, this time joined by Steve’s brother Kevin. It was a great introduction to the east coast and after a couple of drinks we even had the brothers reciting patriotic poems and songs of Australia!

The next morning Steve gave us a little tour of Townsville and a view over the city from Castle Hill before dropping us at a suitable hitching point just out of town. We totally love couchsurfing and can’t wait to host travellers ourselves!

Thomas & Jonno

IMG_6645

I’m still surprised at just how little time we had to wait in Australia before people pulled over to offer us a ride. It was no different leaving Townsville. I think 15 minutes, just enough time to eat a banana and take a quick leak, before Thomas pulled in.

IMG_6664

Thomas was a nice enough lad. An Irishman looking for work. As we chatted about the type of work he was looking for it became apparent that a) he’d lost his wallet the previous day containing $3400 and b) he had no driving license and so was looking for cash-in-hand work. I felt Nina squeeze my left shoulder from the back seat and we implied that we weren’t going far…

IMG_6660

It was only 204km to Bowen where we were meeting our next couchsurf host, Jonno. Jonno had originally agreed to host us in Rockhampton but as he was in Bowen that evening he invited us to join him and a group of fruit picking hippies at a campsite for a gathering. Thomas decided to take us all the way there and join in the fun that evening, although I’m pretty sure he was more hopeful of scoring weed that meeting people!

So we ended up sleeping with Jonno in Ginola’s tent after a communal meal, card games and a few late night drinks with mostly French and Italian fruit pickers.

IMG_6663

Kevin (Steve’s brother)

This is where the journey gets quite funny. Whilst at Steve’s in Townsville we met Kevin who is Steve’s brother. Kevin offered to give us a ride the 717km south to Rockhampton when he returned home a couple of days later but we had already agreed to meet Jonno in Bowen. Jonno was returning to Rokhampton the following day so we would travel with him. Whilst with Jonno he changed his plans as an old girlfriend was in town and decided not to head back to Rocky.

IMG_6670

Nina and I called Kevin, knowing that he was coming our way in the morning and no sooner had we awoken, brushed our teeth and packed up our bedding, Kevin had arrived at the campsite fresh from a 5am departure from Townsville. We were really glad to see kevin and his granddaughter. A couple of nights previous we had got to know each other whilst putting the world to rights and we were soon at it again chatting away in the car, only stopping for ice-cream on route, before being shown around the family home in Rockhampton!

IMG_6675

vince (Kevin & Steve’s brother)

Who could belief that within three days we had stayed with and travelled with three brothers! Yes that’s what happened next. As we were coming into Rockhampton, Kevin’s brother Vince called to say he was in Rockhampton and would soon be heading down to Hervey Bay to meet “a friend with benefits”. Kevin immediately asked if he minded taking a couple of friends (which we were by now) the 400km south and Vince was happy to oblige, collecting us from Kevin’s house half an hour later.

Vince liked to talk. And I must say we were very interested. He was nothing like Kevin, who was nothing like Steve, but he was interesting in his own way. We got to hear about his time as a prison warden, his motivational speeches as a soccer coast, his opinions on health cures such as hydro peroxide and mega doses of vitamin C before he embarrassingly disclosed his new “before bed habit” which had recently replaced reading. He made us try to guess and then told us he was addicted to a computer game on his phone where he had to build up a farm!

IMG_6678

We arrived at the turn off to Hervey bay, now in Childers. Nina and I decided to jump out and try the campgrounds advertised for backpackers as it was now dark and starting to spit with rain a little, plus it was better for the next days chances of hitching, hoping that we would make it all the way to Dulong the following morning.

Jamie & Scott

IMG_6680

We drudged into the campgrounds at Childers to find row upon row of dorm style accommodation full of “twenty something” fruit pickers eager to do their time in the country for an additional year on their visa. It was a sorry site, looking more like the campsite on the last day of Glastonbury Festival. We snuck into the communal kitchen to make a sandwich but there was nowhere clean to prepare it, just an Italian skinning up on the bench.

We introduced ourselves to Alex and asked if people rent a bed or a dorm or what? He shot off to the next block and returned a couple of minutes later to say he had found us a bed even though the other boys in the room weren’t too happy about it. That’s when we met the boys from England, Jamie and Scott. They were paying $173 a week for a dingy dorm bed and were wary of us kipping on their spare mattress for the night. We got chatting and were sharing stories of our trip, their fruit picking adventures and a meal before the night was over. We were up with them at 5am the next morning and as they left for work we made our way to the edge of town.

IMG_6697

warwick, harry & the Nun

From Childers we only had 218km to Nina’s family home in Dulong. It was ironic that we would stand waiting for the longest time in all our hitching days from England to Australia on the last leg of our journey. It was a fresh morning and we welcomed the sun on our backs as we stood for an hour grumbling at the locals who wouldn’t give us a second glance.

Warwick to the rescue! As always – it’s only a matter of time. Warwick pulled over in his big 4×4, towing a boat on route to a fishing trip on Rainbow Island with friends. They’d been planning it for months and as we drove he received calls on his mobile from friends trying to think of excuses for the girlfriends to allow them fishing. We heard all the stories about how he had a reoccurring illness and time with his mates was the best cure. Warren treated us to a coffee and homemade peanut cake then dropped us at a petrol station in Gympie.

IMG_6708

We stepped out of the car and Nina popped in to use the ladies. As she did a man with a nepalese style hippy hoody emerged from the gents. I ran over to Warwick’s 4×4 as I thought I’d left the camera and as I walked back across the garage forecourt the hippy guy was chatting to a Nun in Tibetan buddhist attire. I only know one monastery in the area and it’s not too far from where Nina lives. They disappeared around the corner before Nina reappeared and when she did I said “quick there’s a Nun around the corner, maybe ask them if they’re going our way” and Nina shot off to catch them.

Nina asked if we could grab a ride with them and if they were going to Chenrezig Monastery. They asked Nina how she knew where they were going. Nina looked at the Nun. They told us to hop in and off we went.

The route to the Monastery took us to a turn off 8km from Nina’s family home and by this time Nina had been in touch with her Mum Christina who was super excited to see us and eager to collect us from somewhere. The Nun made us promise never to become a conservative and Harry dropped us at Palmwoods where we waited for Christina.

IMG_6714

christina

As we hopped out of Harry’s people carrier Nina was starting to well up. We had been dropped off at the National Express bus stop by my parents 17 months ago in Thetford and it was quite fitting that Nina’s Mum would be there to collect us for the last leg of our trip.

We felt so surreal. All those months of travel, all the memories, the people, the places and adventures and now we had arrived, stopped. We waited for a while and Christina arrived for our final hitch to Dulong. It was an emotional reunion.

IMG_6723

Thank you too all the folk who picked us up. Hitch hiking across Australia ended up being one of the highlights of our whole trip. It’s a great way to meet real people going about their normal life. We didn’t have a bad experience and actually only had good ones. Yes hitching is about saving money. It’s also about saving carbon. Most importantly though it’s about connecting with people. Maybe it’s easier as a couple as people feel less threatened but I believe it’s easy if you are open.

Every person that picked us up said that they do not usually pick up hitch hikers or that it’s the first time they picked up a hitch hiker and we feel hopeful that it won’t be the last. Since being home we have already collected hitchers and will continue to do so.

From a travel design perspective, hitchhiking, couchsurfing and the occasional bush sleep helped us to journey from Lombok in Indonesia, more than 5000km, over the course of 5 weeks, to Dulong in Queensland, for a total combined cost for accommodation and transport of $74. Who says budget travel is not possible in Australia?

March Against Monsanto

483955_580303788654812_1437672868_n

On May 25, people around the world will unite to March Against Monsanto.

Why?

  • Research studies have shown that Monsanto’s genetically-modified foods can lead to serious health conditions such as the development of cancer tumors, infertility and birth defects.
  • In the United States, the FDA, the agency tasked with ensuring food safety for the population, is steered by ex-Monsanto executives, and we feel that’s a questionable conflict of interests and explains the lack of government-lead research on the long-term effects of GMO products.
  • Recently, the U.S. Congress and president collectively passed the nicknamed “Monsanto Protection Act” that, among other things, bans courts from halting the sale of Monsanto’s genetically-modified seeds.
  • For too long, Monsanto has been the benefactor of corporate subsidies and political favoritism. Organic and small farmers suffer losses while Monsanto continues to forge its monopoly over the world’s food supply, including exclusive patenting rights over seeds and genetic makeup.
  • Monsanto’s GMO seeds are harmful to the environment; for example, scientists have indicated they have caused colony collapse among the world’s bee population.

What solutions do we advocate?

  • Voting with your dollar by buying organic and boycotting Monsanto-owned companies that use GMOs in their products.
  • Labeling of GMOs so that consumers can make those informed decisions easier.
  • Repealing relevant provisions of the US’s “Monsanto Protection Act.”
  • Calling for further scientific research on the health effects of GMOs.
  • Holding Monsanto executives and Monsanto-supporting politicians accountable through direct communication, grassroots journalism, social media, etc.
  • Continuing to inform the public about Monsanto’s secrets.
  • Taking to the streets to show the world and Monsanto that we won’t take these injustices quietly.

We will not stand for cronyism. We will not stand for poison. That’s why the world shall March Against Monsanto.

I send this information out to people with the hope that some of you folk can represent in our absence, as will be on Lombok island, Indonesia…

Find one of the 330 cities already participating: http://bit.ly/ZTDsk8

Or you can do some kind of online thing like we will…

by checking the link here http://on.fb.me/ZUxe3o

say no to monsanto!!!

Buses, Beaches and Bangkok

Screen shot 2013-03-16 at 11.06.38

“Stop the van”!

Yep that was me screaming! I had asked the minivan driver twice to slow down. I had asked the other passengers if they were fearful for their lives. One German guy said “it’s exciting”! The driver ignored any requests. When I noticed 160 on the speedo whilst hurtling around a recommended 60 bend it was enough for me. I was getting out. “Sorry folks, I’m done with this guy”.

Luckily the place we exited the minivan was not so far from the ferry port to Koh Chang, one of Thailand’s most easterly islands.  We explained to the bemused local who saw us jump out, that the driver was crazy. Too much M150, the super strength taurine energy drink that the Thais seem to live for. The local man said that we could take the ferry in the morning and gave us all a ride 4km to a cheap room.

IMG_2122

The next morning we arrived on Koh Chang. We’d promised ourselves, since Paul joined us in China, that we’d head to a beach soon, certainly before he left us to England: it took over two months (once we’d explored a bit of Laos and Cambodia on the way down). It felt even more like we deserved the break off the back of the previous day’s bus and minivan trip from the Cambodian border town of Poipet.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Island life was great. It felt a little non productive and indulgent on one hand but totally deserved on the other. The last beach we set foot on was the long shingle shore of Batumi, Georgia, last September. I hadn’t swam in the sea since Greece and never had I swam in the Gulf of Thailand. We met with Joe. It was great to see another familiar Norfolk face so far from the sticks. The home-sickness was diluted somewhat and we had some fun times including a twin kayak expedition out to an uninhabited island for a spot of swimming.  Paul and I played a DJ gig one night in Ting-Tong, a cool little reggae venue, with wages that managed to cover our accommodation for the week. Nina danced the night away. The most I’ve seen her bop since I played in Bulgaria. Good times.

P1030213

IMG_2034

P1030162

Next stop Bangkok. Only 6 hours by bus from Koh Chang, but with the boat and transfer time it was a full day in transit. We opted for the big bus after I vowed never to take another minivan. Like the other sheep, we were herded on and off vehicles along the well trodden paths of the pancake trail, little stickers attached to show our booking agent and our destination. We were dropped in the famous Khao San Road area of Bangkok. Accommodation was easy to find and super cheap at £2pppn. Here we would spend more than a week of which Joe would be around for a couple of days, Paul’s last 4 days and then just Nina and I for a few more.

IMG_2246

Excluding the suffocating heat and humidity we loved Bangkok! With Joe we explored the huge flower market and did the Chinatown food foot tour. We checked out the giant Buddha at the famous Wat Pho with Paul. We took to the river in the morning, the parks in the evening and the streets at night, mostly looking for Bangkok’s best street food. We were not disappointed. Thailand’s best Pad Thai? Octopus with fat rice noodles. Satay skewers to die for! Real coffee, fresh juices, sweet treats, chilli, river fish, fruit, greens… the list goes on. Keep checking Nina’s blog as I’m sure she’ll be writing about the food of Bangkok…

IMG_2225

IMG_2473

IMG_2717

It was sad to see Paul off in Bangkok. I’m not sure when we will next meet. The homesickness kicked in once more and thoughts of him seeing my family a couple of days from departure was quite heart-wrenching. “Give them a squeeze from me mate”.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We booked ourselves onto a bus north to check out some permaculture projects. I felt and feel pretty disconnected from the inspirational projects, people and general world of permaculture. Although this journey is a permie one, I have been sidetracked. Panya Project, Rak Tamachat and many more interesting demonstration sites are in northern Thailand. Unfortunately soon after we’d booked our bus tickets it was budget check-in time. It’s no surprise that although we have mostly remained on budget, as we head into our 15th month on the road, things are tight. We took the decision to compromise a trip north. We detoured once before, heading up to Romania, but that was for a paid teaching position that justified the extra loop. This time is different. We decided that we have a very unclear time ahead of us and so we should move more directly towards Australia.

IMG_2823

So we find ourselves in Phuket, another overnight bus trip south. Here there are 3 major Marinas. We have put together some posters and will advertise ourselves as volunteer crew for any boats, yachts or ships heading south towards Malaysia, Indonesia or Australia. We spent the last two days on a moped in and about the Marinas and Yacht clubs pinning up posters, chatting to potential skippers and getting the general lowdown on boat hitching a ride. From here boats stop in Langkawi, Malaysia and so we may well travel there by bus soon, connecting ports and marinas along the way. There are Wwoof hosts and Permcaulture projects on route so we’re back to a game of dot-to-dot, similar to our european leg. Wish us luck!

CREWAD

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Check out Nina’s blog here

So long China

After two months holed up in Dali we finally set off south yesterday and into Laos. Dali provided a welcome break on our long push to Australia as well as plenty of opportunities to relax, DJ, eat amazing food and not to mention the great people we enjoyed good times with.

So long Dali, thank you. Thank you Vivi for having us. Thank you Scott and Carl and all you Bad Monkey crew for our DJ residency. Thank you Chenli and Charlie for putting up with us. Be careful Andy, no really, be safe. Nice partying with you Peter, get well soon Fabrizio. Good luck with the dancing Saphire. Look after that english lad Hao. Bye bye Juan. Good luck Sam and farewell YoYo, look after each other. A gallery of good times in Dali…